It Has Been Awhile…

Since my last update I have been working vigorously on the iOS app, as well as my own personal project, DevelopVille. I have received some really great feedback regarding DevelopVille. The first one I would like to mention is a name change: I was told that DevelopVille is a bit of a mouthful to say; it was recommended that the name change to DevVille (which I happen to like a lot). While I like the new name, it is a real pain having to design another logo (not really :P) and implement into my existing work. What do you think about the name DevVille compared to DevelopVille?

I’ve also been uploading much of my work to my GitHub account, which you can visit at here.

 

 

CrunchBase Reveals: The Average Successful Startup Raises $41M, Exits at $242.9M

TechCrunch

The CrunchBase dataset has now captured more venture exits than ever, so we decided to take a closer look at what successful startups can tell us about venture investing and the startup landscape.

We found that the average successful US startup has raised $41 million and exited at $242.9 million. We also found that there is a strong correlation between larger exits and companies that raised more money, but no such relationship between the amount of time between founding a company and being acquired or taken public.

Between the two types of exits, we found that the average successfully acquired U.S. startup has raised $29.4 million and sold for $155.5 million, for investor profits of about 7.5x (if you assume 100 percent investor ownership of the company, which is never the case). Startups that went public in an IPO raised significantly more funds, but also took substantially more venture funding…

View original post 305 more words

Why You Should Learn JavaScript

Tags

, , , , ,

Image Lately I have been seeing many posts around the Internet about how JavaScript should be the programming language you learn, even if it is the ONLY one you learn. You may be asking yourself “Why’s that?”. Well, let me tell you why. Javascript is basically the reason that web users are able to input information and interact with websites. Let me iterate what Hack Reactor (andwhere I am citing some information from in this post, link to actual blog post @ Hack Reactor below) co-founder, Shawn Drost, shared about the technical side of JavaScript and how it works in conjunction with different websites; “Gmail and Google Maps were the first ‘rich client apps’ – applications where the HTML was generated in the browser, by Javascript (the only language that runs in the browser), using data gathered in the background from servers,” Drost explains. “This architectural style offers interactivity features that aren’t possible in the old model, and as such, most of the applications you interact with daily are now built in this manner (or transitioning to it). We’re in a very exciting era, and we have an opportunity to educate the first native speakers of this new paradigm. When you think about how integral that JavaScript/browser relationship is to our web user experience, you start to understand how incredibly valuable  learning the language can be for a future computer programmer.”

That being stated, this is a perfect example of why you should learn JavaScript if you’re looking to pursue a career in computer programming or just interested in learning how to code in general. 

Learn JavaScript If It’s the Only Thing You Do

If you’re interested in learning more about Hack Reactor, Click Here!

Just an Idea..

Tags

I would like to share an idea I have. I’d like this idea to be an open source idea where many different people contribute their ideas to it. My reasoning for this is because if a variety of people contribute to this one project, then this one project will be directed at an even wider range of people, mainly developers (you’ll see why this is soon). So, lets get down to business here. My idea is for a website at first, then possibly expanding to the iOS, Android, and Windows Phone platforms as an application. The website would be a place for developers and people who work in the technology field to come and share their ideas, meet people who share the same interests, collaborate code and ideas, etc. all in one place. It would be along the lines of a social media site, but aimed specifically at developers. I’m sure there are website’s similar to this already in existence, but I would really like to create my own spin-off. I believe that this website could be a success if I approach it the right way. I wouldn’t start this with the mindset of taking over existing similar services, but rather as being another resource for their users to use in order to find the best possible solution for the problem or issue they are facing, if any.

The site could have sections that are catered to different types of developers, platforms, services, and categories of apps. Also, the site could feature a forum where users can go to discuss current events in technology such as startups, investments being made, etc.

I’d really like to know what people think of this idea. Obviously, this is just the very beginning stages of this idea and there is still much more to it. Any comments / suggestions are welcome!

An Introduction

Hello everyone who has found their way to my personal blog / website! I’ll be using this site as a way to talk about what I am working on currently, my interests, things I’ve learned and code I have been working on outside of my employment.

First off, I would like to start off by giving a brief introduction into my life currently and the project I am working on. My name is Kyle Maune and I am a Front-end Developer for a small startup company. We’re currently working on a really great app for iOS that will be available Early 2014. I’m really excited about this project because this is my first “real” developer job I have had the opportunity to be a part of. Due to NDA (non-disclosure agreement) reasons I cannot talk about the app in detail, but soon enough!! 😉

Second, I would like to give everyone reading a background into how I found myself working in the world of technology, specifically the computer programming aspect of it all. From a young age I always had an interest in computers and how they were able to make things work. My interest really peaked when we first got the Internet in my home; I was amazed by all the content available online, right at my fingertips. The more I would browse around, the more I noticed how websites were designed and how some were much more interactive than others. This led me to start wondering why this is the way it is. Long story short, this is what really peaked my interest into learning how to build and create websites, which ultimately led to an interest in creating really great programs for people to enjoy.